30-70AD Matthew 24:7 "Pestilences"


about 30AD
HISTORY (Fulfillment)
before the disappearrance of the Apostles, before 70AD

Mat 24:7
And there will be famines, pestilences, and earthquakes in various places.



Luke 21:11
And there will be great earthquakes in various places, and famines and pestilences;

61 AD Pestilence in Asia and Ephesus. ~ R.H. Charles, Revelation, New International Critical Commentary, Vol. I, 155
65 AD Pestilence decimates Rome; Suetonius gives the number of those cut down by the plague at thirty-thousand. The pestilence was followed by a hurricane in Campania: “Upon this year, disgraced by so many deeds of shame, Heaven also set its mark by tempest and by disease. Campania was wasted by a whirlwind [hurricane], which far and wide wrecked the farms, the fruit trees, and the crops, and carried its fury to the neighbourhood of the capital, here all classes of men were being decimated by a deadly epidemic. No outward sign of a distempered air was visible. Yet the houses were filled with lifeless bodies, the streets with funerals. Neither sex nor age gave immunity from danger; slaves and the free-born populace alike were summarily cut down, amid the laments of their wives and children, who, themselves infected while tending or mourning the victims, were often thrown upon the same pyre.” ~ Tacitus, Annals, XVI, xiii.
69 AD Upon entering Rome, all military discipline is abandoned; Vitellius’ troops spread over the city, lodging wherever they liked and doing whatever mischief they pleased; inactivity, debauchery and unhealthy conditions result in disease and many deaths. ~ Tacitus, Histories, II, lxxxviii, xciii
70 AD Vespasian’s forces invade Italy; Vicetia, birthplace of Caecina taken; Verona occupied. Antonius gives troops license to plunder civilians in the district around Cremona. ~ Tacitus, Histories, III, xv  City of Cremona surrenders; burned; fifty-thousand perished. The soil was so infected by blood of slain, army forced to move three miles away to avoid danger of pestilence. ~ Dio Cassius, LXIV, xv; Tacitus, Histories, III, xxxiv-v